Counting Culture

Counting Culture - Six principles for Measuring the Cultural Diversity of your Workplace

Mapping the cultural diversity of your workforce lets you assess how well your organisation supports the markets, customers, and clients it wants to serve.

In DCA's Counting Culture guide, six principles provide guidance on how you can map the cultural diversity of your workforce in a way that is respectful, accurate, inclusive, and well suited to the multiculturalism of Australian businesses.

Here are the key take-outs to bear in mind when you’re Counting Culture:

Principle 1: Recognise Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Unique Position

 

We recommend organisations recognise Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Australians’ unique position by separating Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples from the broad category of ‘cultural diversity’ when Counting Culture.

 

Principle 2: Remember Identity is Key - How we see ourselves and how others see us

 

Counting Culture encourages organisations to adopt an identity-based definition of cultural diversity, which recognises the significant impact identity – how we see ourselves and how others see us – has on our experience of inclusion at work. 

 

Principle 3: Use multiple indicators

 

Our cultural identity is made up of many aspects – for example, an employee may be born in Australia, have Lebanese ancestry, speak English, Arabic and French, and identify as Christian – and these all have relevance to their experience of inclusion at work. 

 

Principle 4: Simple is good but not too simple

 

Ensure you go beyond simple headline ‘culturally diverse’ statistics (e.g. ‘Are you culturally diverse?’) so you’re able to generate rich, valuable workforce insights.

 

Principle 5: Engage with intersectionality

 

Intersectionality refers to the way that multiple aspects of diversity, like age, sexual orientation and gender identity, come together or ‘intersect’ and form part of our identity – and therefore our experience of inclusion at work. 

 

Principle 6: Think Benchmarks

 

Comparing the degree and breadth of cultural assets in your organisation against those found in Australia’s general community, in your industry, in key labour market pools or in your customer base will let you see how well your workforce reflects and can therefore attract, respond to and service this cultural diversity.

 

Members can download the full report from the members-only section below.

The rest of this content is restricted to DCA members.